DIY: How to Filter Water Using Binchotan Charcoals

in DIY, Drinks

DIY: How to Filter Water Using Binchotan Charcoals // www.acozykitchen.com

Ok, so let me preface this post by saying that this isn’t a recipe. This isn’t a recipe for filtered water because that would be RIDICULOUS. And it’d be much like Paula Deen’s recipe for English peas. Remember this? It was amazing. No salt, no pepper, no nothing. Just lots of butter and peas. Very Paula-style!

A few months ago Rikumo offerred to send me a few pieces of Binchotan charcoal. I was super intrigued after reading about its purifying capabilities so I said yes, and a few days later it arrived wrapped in a piece of brown paper. As I did some research I found some interesting things. For starters, Binchotan charcoal is made in the Kishu region of Japan and is activated through extremely high burning temperatures, along with a rapid cooling process.

After this process, these charcoals are extremely porous and end up having a variety of uses; mainly ones that call for absorbing impurities. They’re specifically known for enhancing blood circulation when placed in hot baths, absorbing odors when placed in closets, smelly fridges or shoes, stimulating soil in your garden and lastly, purifying drinking water.

Purifying drinking water with these Binchotan charcoals is a bit of a process (albeit a very short and easy one), so I figured I’d show you, in case this is very new-to-you (it was to me too, like, two days ago).

If you’ve ever seen the film Chinatown, you know that water is a big deal in Los Angeles. There is heavy debate as to whether Los Angeles has super healthy water or water that follows outdated regulations. Because I can’t do a full-on investigation myself, I always filter my water or use bottled (though I try and stay away from the bottled stuff whenever possible). And honestly, I don’t love the way Los Angeles water tastes. When I lived in North Carolina, I thought the water was delicious! It tasted like it was straight from a spring. So, I was pleasantly surprised when I could taste the difference from these charcoals.

Step 1: When you receive the charcoals, they’ll be dusty. This isn’t a big deal if you’re putting them in a bath or placing them in your fridge, but since we’re purifying water with them, we’re going to start by rinsing and brushing off the excess ash.

DIY: How to Filter Water Using Binchotan Charcoals // www.acozykitchen.com

Step 2: Transfer the charcoals to a pot of water and boil for 10 minutes. Drain the water and allow the charcoals to cool completely.

DIY: How to Filter Water Using Binchotan Charcoals // www.acozykitchen.com

Step 3: Fill your container with water and place the cooled charcoal inside. Allow the two to sit for several hours; about 2-3 hours. During this time the charcoal will absorb the impurities in the water.

Step 4: Feel free to leave the charcoal in the container and refill it when you’re low on water. The charcoal will work for 2 to 3 weeks until it needs to be refreshed.

DIY: How to Filter Water Using Binchotan Charcoals // www.acozykitchen.com

Step 5: Refreshing the charcoal is super easy. Simply boil it for 10 minutes and it’s good to go. The company that makes this charcoal recommends replacing it all together every 3 months or so.

DIY: How to Filter Water Using Binchotan Charcoals // www.acozykitchen.com

This cool-looking Chikuno Cube has replaced the box of baking soda that used to be in my fridge—it’s very effective! I also have my eye on this charcoal toothbrush. I think they’re pretty cool.


*This is not a sponsored post. I just think it’s a super cool product and wanted to share.

{ 14 comments… read them below or add one }

Belinda@themoonblushbaker January 20, 2014 at 2:31 am

I do this too! I used filtered water when making breads and coctails; so this super cheap and easy way.
I saved a fortune on bottle water too. You should share more of your tricks for the kitchen; I would love to see what you discover!

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Adrianna Adarme January 20, 2014 at 9:30 am

Thank you! I’ll be sure to share more “tricks”!

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movita beaucoup January 20, 2014 at 3:31 am

So… no recipe for filtered water?

I guess I’ll go see if Paula has one posted…

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Adrianna Adarme January 20, 2014 at 9:30 am

Should I write one out? I was going to!

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Lin January 20, 2014 at 9:27 am

Thank you so much for this post. I have wondered about this charcoal and now I know. Have a wonderful day.

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T.R. January 20, 2014 at 9:39 am

I’m going to try this. LA water scares me. When I lived on the east coast/south I NEVER bought water. Here I’ve heard so many rumors about the water, I’m more of a better safe than sorry kind of girl. But I’d love to find something different. And I’m digging the charcoal cube as well. The toothbrush may take a little more time to grown on me. :O)

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christin January 20, 2014 at 10:43 am

i am totally going to try this with the bath. we have a pretty intense water filtration system because my boyfriend is into that sort of thing but i get what you mean about water. NYC water tastes like its from the pool!

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Lori January 20, 2014 at 9:02 pm

Very cool post. I’ve been using the britas for awhile and our city’s tap is no bueno. I think they do the minimum just to make it barely safe to drink. I looked up the site to buy the charcoal sticks, lo and behold the brick and mortar store is in Philly!! I live in Philly. Off to buy some sticks ;)

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AllieBeau January 22, 2014 at 6:58 pm

The only thing better than that Paula Deen recipe is the comments (such as “once I mastered the can opener it was a breeze!”) Ohhh man. Thank you for calling this to my attention.

My fiancé has mentioned filtering stuff with carbon. I’m glad I found this– I’m about to move to LA from Boston (actually found you by googling “LA food lifestyle blogs”) and was quite concerned about the tap water situation! This seems like an easy solution considering I drink like 5 gallons a day.

Welp. I’m off to creep on the rest of your blog!

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Adrianna Adarme January 23, 2014 at 10:14 am

HAHA! Welcome, welcome!

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Chris Filter January 23, 2014 at 11:13 pm

It’s true that an activated charcoal can remove chlorine, so itl eaves no pool scence on water, thank you for sharing Adrianna

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Makeda March 31, 2014 at 7:00 pm

This is great! How much charcoal would be appropriate for 3-5 gallons of water? Thanks so much!

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Mara October 5, 2014 at 9:56 pm

I recently started trying this, and I really want to stick with it, but I think it is giving me stomach pains? The first time I tried it, I only drank about a cup, and an hour or so later, I had horrible stomach cramps. They lasted for the rest of the day. I couldn’t think of what I had eaten differently that day, aside from drinking the charcoal water!
So I didn’t try it again until a few weeks later. I had very little, just to test it, and I was fine. So then I drank more, and the stomach cramps were back, but very faint this time. I think because I drank less than I did that first time. SO. Has this happened to anyone else? And do you have any links about any risks there might be to this? I can’t find much about it CAUSING any problems, but I’m afraid to keep drinking it!

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Adrianna Adarme October 6, 2014 at 12:35 pm

Ooof! I haven’t heard any negative side effects to these charcoals, but if that was happening to me, I’d stop IMMEDIATELY! Sorry these are giving you troubles.

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